Vote on your favourite book cover!

Vote on your favourite book cover!

Posted on September 25 by admin
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Today’s book cover contest features four books that relate to the topic of Home Children. You can find out more about these titles below. But first, choose your favourite cover!

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Whatever Happened to Mary Janeway? (by Mary Pettit):  Mary Janeway, a home child, runs away from her farm placement near Innerkip, Ontario, grows into adulthood, and despite her difficult childhood and tragedies as an adult, ultimately comes to terms with life in Hamilton.

Marjorie Too Afraid to Cry (by Patricia Skidmore): Marjorie Arnison was one of the thousands of children removed from their families, communities, and country and placed in a British colony or commonwealth to provide “white stock” and cheap labour. In Marjorie’s case, she was sent to Prince of Wales Fairbridge Farm School, just north of Victoria, British Columbia, in 1937. As a child, Patricia was angered that her mother wouldn’t talk about the past. It took many years to discover why — it wasn’t because she was keeping a dark secret, but because she had “lost” her childhood.
For 10-year-old Marjorie, forgetting her past, her family, and England was the only survival tool she had at her disposal to enable her to face her frightening and uncertain future. This is Marjorie’s account as told by her daughter. It is a story of fear, loss, courage, survival, and finding one’s way home.

Planters, Paupers, and Pioneers (by Lucille H. Campey): The first-ever comprehensive book written on early English immigration to Canada, Planters, Paupers, and Pioneers introduces a series of three titles on The English in Canada. Focusing on factors that brought the English to Atlantic Canada, it traces the English arrivals to their various settlements in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland, and considers their reasons for leaving their homeland. Who were they? When did they arrive? Were they successful? What was their lasting impact? Drawing on wide-ranging documentary sources, including passenger lists, newspaper shipping reports, and the wealth of material to be found in English county record offices and in Canadian national and provincial archives, the book provides extensive details of the immigrants and their settlements and gives details of more than 700 Atlantic crossings essential reading for individuals wishing to trace English and Canadian family links or to deepen understanding of the emigration process.

Wolfe Island (by Barbara Wall LaRocque): Wolfe Island begins with the emergence of islands at the end of the last ice age and moves through the many centuries of First Nations habitation to the era of French exploration and the fur trading, the arrival of the earliest British settlers and the United Empire Loyalists, up to current time. The development and decline of industry, the evolution of facilities, land title frustrations, and the emergence of a strong sense of identity among the inhabitants are featured, along with a wealth of anecdotes based on colourful and eccentric personalities. This extensively researched history of Wolfe Island is a treasure trove for history buffs.