Vote on your favourite book cover!

Vote on your favourite book cover!

Posted on November 6 by admin
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Today’s four featured covers are all on the theme of military history. You find out more about each of these book below. But first, pick your favourite cover!

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The Pendulum of War (by Richard Feltoe): In his second of six books in the series Upper Canada Preserved — War of 1812, author Richard Feltoe continues a battlefield chronicle that combines the best of modern historical research with extensive quotes from original official documents and personal letters, bringing to life the crucial first six months of the 1813 American campaign to invade and conquer Upper Canada. The Pendulum of War documents the course of more than seven major battles and over a dozen minor engagements that were fought on the St. Lawrence, Niagara, and Detroit frontiers to control Upper Canada during this period. It also reveals some of the behind-the-scenes personal stories and conflicts of the personalities involved.

Throughout the work, historical images are counterpointed with modern pictures taken from the same perspective to give a true then-and-now effect. Strategic maps trace the course of the campaign, while never-before-published battlefield maps reveal the shifting formations of troops across a geographically accurate terrain.

Raymond Collishaw and the Black Flight (by Roger Gunn) Ever wondered what it would be like to fly a biplane or triplane in the First World War? Raymond Collishaw and the Black Flight takes you to the Western Front during the Great War. Experience the risks of combat and the many close calls Collishaw had as a pilot, flight commander, and squadron leader. Understand the courage Collishaw and his fellow flyers faced every day they took to the air in their small, light, and very manoeuvrable craft to face the enemy.
As the third-highest-scoring flying ace among British and colonial pilots in the First World War, scoring 60 victories, Collishaw was only surpassed by Billy Bishop and Edward Mannock. This book traces Collishaw’s life from humble beginnings in Nanaimo, British Columbia, to victories in the skies over France.

York’s Sacrifice (by Janice Nickerson) The militia’s contribution to the War of 1812 is not well understood. Even now, 200 years later, we don’t know how many Upper Canadian militia men died defending their home.
York’s Sacrifice profiles 39 men who lost their lives during the war. They include 19 residents of the Town of York, five residents of York County, and 11 residents of Halton, Peel, and Wentworth Counties. Where possible, biographies include information about each man’s origin, residence, occupation, civic life, family, militia service, and circumstances of death. A section on records provides detailed guidance in finding and using records from the period to trace an ancestors militia service and life in this difficult time period.
A complete list of men who served in the three York regiments during the war indentifies those who were killed, injured, captured, or deserted.

Doing Canada Proud (by Colonel Bernd Horn) In the fall of 1899, Britain entered the Second Anglo-Boer War in South Africa confident that its army would make short work of a collection of armed farmers. However, initial confrontations quickly changed attitudes. Following a series of humiliating defeats, Britain quickly sought additional troops. Canada answered the call, and its first contingent consisted of the 2nd (Special Service) Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment (RCR).
Fighting their first battle at Paardeburg Drift from February 18 to 27, 1900, The RCR did Canada proud, serving with distinction and demonstrating endurance and tenacity that rivalled the famous British regulars. This victory came at a cost, though. The RCR suffered 39 killed and 123 wounded, but its accomplishments were impressive. Canadians delivered the first major British triumph, which became the turning point of the conflict. The victory also awakened patriotism and national identity at home and earned Canada recognition as a sovereign power.