Vote on your favourite book cover!

Vote on your favourite book cover!

Posted on December 11 by admin
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Today’s book cover poll features four books for teens. The winner will be the book that is given away in this week’s Twitter contest. You can find out more about each one below, but first, pick your favourite cover!

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Eldritch Manor by Kim Thompson: Twelve-year-old Willa Fuller is convinced that the old folks in the shabby boarding house down the street are prisoners of their sinister landlady, Miss Trang. Only when Willa is hired on as housekeeper does she discover the truth, which is far more fascinating.
Eldritch Manor is a retirement home for some very strange beings indeed. All have stories to tell — and petty grievances with one another and the world at large.
Storm clouds are on the horizon, however, and when Miss Trang departs on urgent business, Willa is left to babysit the cantankerous bunch. Can she keep the oldsters in line, stitch up unravelling time, and repel an all-out attack from the forces of darkness … all while keeping the nosy neighbours out of their business and uncovering a startling secret about her own past?

Failed Hope: the Story of the Lost Peace by John Wilson: Beginning with the Treaty of Versailles and the hope for the birth of a better world, Failed Hope follows the postwar rise of fascism, social unrest, Prohibition, the Great Depression, Adolf Hitler’s rise to power, and the wars in Abyssinia, Spain, and China. The general strike in Winnipeg provides a Canadian perspective to the global labour turmoil of the period. The book ends with the failure of appeasement and the outbreak of the Second World War.

The information is presented in easily digestible segments, accompanied by photographs. Informative sidebars provide background information or connect world events to activities in Canada.

Failed Hope links with John Wilson’s two previous books, Desperate Glory and Bitter Ashes, covering the history of the 20th century from 1914 to 1945 and the effects of its world wars.

The Gargoyle at the Gates by Philippa Dowding: Christopher has a problem. He has just moved to Toronto. He has a new school and no friends. But even worse, the park next door is creepy: voices whisper in the bushes, and something throws apples at his window and howls at the moon. But what? Gargoyles! Their names are Gargoth and Ambergine, and they need help. An evil thief called the Collector is after them and wants to lock them away in his dark mansion, forever. Befriending a gargoyle takes courage, but it’s worth it. Once he does, Christopher suddenly has more friends than he ever imagined, including Katherine, a girl from his class who knows the gargoyles, as well. When the Collector steals Ambergine, it’s up to Christopher and Katherine to get her back, as long as something else doesn’t catch them along the way. This is the third book in the award-nominated Lost Gargoyle series.

Canadian Sports Sites for Kids by Christopher MacKinnon: In Canada, sports aren’t just entertainment; they’re literally part of the landscape. We’ve named everything from parks and streets to schools and stadiums after some of our favourite pro athletes and sports figures past and present.
Wayne Gretzky Drive, Mike Weir Park, Roberto Luongo Arena, the Cindy Klassen Centre, Justin Morneau Field — Canadian Sports Sites for Kids is your entertaining, map-filled guidebook to hundreds of these special locations. The fast-paced stories, maps, and lists highlight everything you need to know about Canada’s sports geography.
Plus, explore other little-known sites of interest, such as:
• The Canadian city that named a park after an arm-wrestling promoter
• The Ontario town that honoured a hockey fan with a place name
• The Prince Edward Island village where the biggest street is named for the writer of “The Hockey Song”
• The whereabouts of Canada’s only street named for a boxing champ