Fiction

Category: Fiction

Andre Babyn Nanowrimo Blog

For me the hardest part about writing literary fiction is having something to work with. Once you have a full draft it’s only a matter of time before it becomes what it is. But building out that first draft, in the face of everything that it could be, that it will not be, that you want it to be—that’s difficult.

 

Sadia and Stowaway Award and Nomination

An Award Win and Nomination for Two YA Titles!

Posted on October 18 by Dundurn Guest in Awards, Fiction, Kids, Teens

Dundurn Press is excited to announce that Sadia by Colleen Nelson has won the High Plains Book Award in the YA category!

Sadia follows 15-year-old Sadia Ahmed as she struggles to navigate high school, her passion for basketball, and her Muslim faith, as well as finding the courage to stand up for herself in the face of discrimination. Booklist called Sadia “compelling and relevant,” and in 2019 the book was both nominated for the Forest of Reading’s 2019 Red Maple Award and won the 2019 Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Children’s Book Award.

(Photos by: Dave Butler)

 

Should fiction be used for good, or for evil?

That was the question posed to me at a recent festival where I was giving the keynote speech. I had shared my thoughts with the evening’s participants about how the relatively new literary genre known as eco-fiction has influenced conservation, and vice-versa. I offered a list of books that I believe have played that role, including Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam Trilogy, The Road by Cormac McCarthy and even Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax, among many others.

“I’m sorry to inform you that your husband has been shot and killed.” Words no wife should ever have to hear. Worse yet when the murder was the random result of a case of mistaken identity. Wrong spot, wrong time – gunned down for driving a vehicle similar to one owned by a gangster being hunted by an opposing gang.

 

My novel, The Showrunner, features three strong-willed women who work behind the scenes on a TV drama. Ann is the Older Established Boss who is losing her grip, Stacey is the disciplined Younger Up and Coming Producer headed to the top, and Jenna is the Struggling Actress turned Assistant looking out for herself.

 

If you've ever toiled in a competitive, back stabbing work environment – and who hasn't? – you've known an Ann, Stacey or Jenna. Maybe you've been one yourself. Try these quiz questions and find out:

 

“Well, no,” I say, a little taken aback. “I was on the subway during the bombing, so I totally don’t think it’s okay, but it also doesn’t seem right to just let innocent people die.”

Sandra nods. “I understand. But tough times call for tough decisions. We’ve done this to ourselves. Humans...the most destructive species ever. We’ve ruined the biosphere — The Earth — and overpopulated ourselves.”

— excerpt from Finding Jade

 

Before the mid-twentieth century, if you’d asked someone to describe a quintessentially Canadian story, they might’ve used the words “historical” and “wilderness”. That’s because many of the popular Canadian books from this period — such as Wacousta (1832) or The Man From Glengarry (1901) — followed characters contending with natural forces and historical contexts. These kinds of books created a mythology around a so-called Canadian identity: a mythology rooted in the natural landscape and a particular version of the country’s history.

Bringing the Funny

Posted on May 30 by Mark Sampson in Fiction

Being an author almost always means being a reader first. Before I set out on any new writing project — whether it’s the lengthy drudge of a novel, or the more abbreviated jaunt into a short story or poem — I become very cognizant of, and even go back and reread, major works written in a similar vein that came before.

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