history

Category: history

When people ask me how I came to write a novel — And Then the Sky Exploded — about the bomb that was dropped on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, on August 6, 1945, and the devastation that followed,  I have to be honest and admit I’m not really sure.

October 20, 2016 ― The woman who led the successful national campaign to have women depicted on Canadian money has been awarded the 2016 Governor General’s History Award for Popular Media (Pierre Berton Award). Merna Forster’s campaign resulted in a petition of more than 73,000 names and a commitment from the prime minister to feature a woman from Canadian history on bank notes in 2018.

We Remember

Posted on October 20 by Kyle

We remember tales of battles past; stories of monumental moments that shaped history and the people who lived them.

It's no surprise that we at Dundurn strive to help define Canada with such stories. 

Immerse yourself in some history this fall.

From October 11, 2016 - November 11, 2016, get 25% off select paperback history books! Use promo code: REMEMBER

 

In her third adventure, In Over Her Head, Hannah Smart sets sail for the Treasure Coast, where she and a team of treasure hunters search for long lost riches, hidden for centuries under the sea. 

But what is this treasure and how did it get there in the first place? 

Early in the book, Patrice de la Fontaine (the flamboyant and high-strung director of Teenage Treasure Hunters) shares the story of The Queen’s Jewels, spinning a wild tale of intrigue, greed, and death.

Hamilton’s heritage homes and museums teem with anecdotes and stories, vividly conveying the early history of a Steel City fast transforming itself into a knowledge and cultural destination. Here are seven pieces of history I learned from Hamilton curators and museum guides.

 

Fundamental changes are being triggered in these lands. Curricula are being rewritten across the country by provincial ministries of education to incorporate treaty education and Indigenous perspectives in their education systems. Added to this is the push in education circles to implement "inquiry-based learning," an approach that nurtures students' natural predispositions to issues concerning social justice and human rights.

Ukkusiksalik is the traditional name of a region in the northwestern corner of Hudson Bay. No one lives there today, but for the Inuit it has a special significance because it was a land of plenty for their ancestors, a bountiful hunting ground where one could always find food. In difficult times and in times of hunger, people came from the north and the south and from inland to the west to find sustenance in Ukkusiksalik. As a result, it is a landscape of stories.

Syrian Arab Republic Flag

In the late summer of 2015, a single image served to crystallize emotions and outrage around the world. The image was that of a Syrian toddler’s corpse that had been discovered washed up on a Turkish beach. When this heart-breaking photo appeared on the front pages of the world’s newspapers the hordes of asylum-seekers then pressing for entry into the European Union suddenly had a human face.

Dundurn Press Earns Four Heritage Toronto Book Award Nominations

 

TORONTO, ON (Sept 16) Dundurn is pleased to announce that four of its titles have been nominated for the 2015 Heritage Toronto Book Award: Riverdale: East of the Don by Elizabeth Gillan (Liz) Muir; Inside the Museums: Toronto’s Heritage Sites and Their Most Prized Objects by John Goddard; The History of Sunnybrook: Battle to Greatness by Francesca Grosso; and Lost Breweries of Toronto by Jordan St. John.

 

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