history

Category: history

Liberation of Paris

Posted on August 26 by Ray Argyle

Among all the cities of Europe that fell under the Nazi boot in the Second World War, the loss of Paris touched a raw nerve among those who fought the German war machine.

Paris was no Stalingrad, fought over from house to house, nor was it the victim, like London, of merciless aerial attack. It stood as a symbol of culture and freedom — of what had been lost to the Nazis and what must be regained for the world.

When Paris fell to the Germans on June 10, 1940, it truly seemed as if, in the words of an earlier British foreign minister, the lights had gone out all over Europe.

Interview with Natasha L. Henry, author of Emancipation Day thumbnail

Tell us about your book.
My book, Emancipation Day: Celebrating Freedom in Canada, is about the history and evolution of the August first commemoration of the abolition of slavery in Canada and the diverse people who celebrated this popular annual event.

Interview with Natasha L. Henry, author of Emancipation Day thumbnail

Tell us about your book.
My book, Emancipation Day: Celebrating Freedom in Canada, is about the history and evolution of the August first commemoration of the abolition of slavery in Canada and the diverse people who celebrated this popular annual event.

1. The Orange Order began as an Irish Protestant fraternity sometimes referred to as the Loyal Order of Lodgemen, or LOL.

 2. Robert Baldwin, of Spadina House, instructed that a male version of a Caesarean section be performed on his corpse in homage to his beloved wife, Eliza, who died at twenty-five in 1836 after such an operation.

 3. To project a dignified image as Mayor of Toronto in 1846, William Boulton sat for his official portrait wearing black silk stockings, frilly sleeves, and white lace exploding out of his vest.

The Great Escape: Winner of the Libris Award Non-Fiction Book of the Year! thumbnail

The Great Escape, the bestselling history title from acclaimed broadcaster,  military historian, and author Ted Barris, was honoured at this week's Libris Award ceremony, sharing the award for Best Non-Fiction Title with Chris Hadfield’s  An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth.

Pages