Mystery

Category: Mystery

Vancouver Noir

Posted on August 8 by Sam Wiebe

Browse the mystery section of your local bookstore, and you’ll be hard-pressed to find a book that doesn’t have a subtitle of the “A [Detective’s Name] Investigation” variety. Whether it’s a Rebus novel or a Miss Marple mystery, the common thread and selling point of the series is the stability of the main character. It’s a reassurance to the readers that nothing will really happen to them.



Writing mysteries is a space of my own, where words surround me


Their sounds vibrate with silence and seduction, symphony and serendipity


Inspiration coalesing into clarity, like figures emerging from the fog


Words rant and rave, wild and free, lassoeed and tamed


To turn to prose that is all encompassing ……….to turn to mystery


Words drenched in meaning  - love, hate, soul, greed, evil, lust, motive, menacing, mystical


Paint a thousand pictures, the brushstrokes different for every canvas

The End Game

Posted on April 27 by Brenda Chapman

One of the toughest parts about writing a mystery novel is crafting the ending. When I begin a manuscript, I have a general idea of the crime and who the culprit will be. Over the next 80,000 to 90,000 words, I develop characters, insert clues and red herrings, and work to make the plot gallop along at a steady clip. Along about the point where the action reaches its climax and the killer is to be revealed, the agonizing begins. How will my sleuth put together all of the clues in a way that is not obviously being manipulated by me?

The Perfect Crime

Posted on April 26 by Steve Burrows

The perfect crime is possible. In fact, my next book opens with one. But you can’t sustain a mystery novel with just a perfect crime for very long. A perfect crime, by definition, is one that leaves no clues, and clues, as we all know, are the lifeblood of mysteries. If the contest between writer and reader is going to be a meaningful one, then the clues need to be sufficient, and sufficiently cryptic, to give a quick-witted reader a sporting chance of solving the mystery.

This morning Dundurn Press was pleased to learn that three of its crime writers were shortlisted for this year’s Arthur Ellis Awards, further concretizing its reputation for producing stellar Canadian crime and mystery writing and publishing groundbreaking new authors. The shortlist was announced yesterday evening in events across the country.

Pages